Receive Generosity

posted on: September 10th, 2011

Rick Hanson

Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. His books include Hardwiring Happiness (in 14 languages), Buddha’s Brain (in 25 languages), Just One Thing (in 14 languages), and Mother Nurture. He edits the Wise Brain Bulletin and has several audio programs. A summa cum laude graduate of UCLA and founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, he’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. His work has been featured on BBC, CBS, and NPR, and he offers the free Just One Thing newsletter with over 100,000 subscribers, plus the online Foundations of Well-Being program in positive neuroplasticity.

  • Ellie

    I’ve been trying to practice things that increase my feelings of belonging and acceptance, but have a few questions.

    1) I have a lot to work against. My childhood and young adulthood included a lot of rejection and very little displays of affection or approval. My current life lacks in the support I would like to have. I work on growing my self-acceptance, but at some point I feel like it isn’t enough to just build it on my own. I feel I need experiences to take in the good to address these deficiencies. But I don’t know where to find them.

    2) say my upbringing and feeling of rejection or not being accepted was the same, but my life was full of people who accepted me and outwardly showed love. I feel like that would create a dependency on external influences. From what I’ve read, it sound like you say that taking in the good from these experiences is enough to override the feeling of not belonging. Is this correct? If so, I really wish I had them.

  • Denise Torres

    Wow, I’m hearing that maybe you’re feeling tired and alone, is that right? Maybe you’re wanting connection and to be seen for who you really are, is that right?

    I find it difficult to step up into an experience of ease if I’m in the middle of difficulty. What I have found helpful have been two things Rick talks about. The first is I imagine having an amazing friend who totally gets me. I imagine she sees me for who I am and supports me with kindness and compassion when things aren’t going well. I imagine the softness of her expression and her smile. I take this sense of being seen in deeply because it will hold the part of me that is suffering; and as it does, it will temper the suffering so that in the future, should it arise again, it will become softer. I am also practicing Vipassana which helps me watch the rise and fall of these difficult states and reminds me that even though my body maybe convinced that is who I am, that isn’t truly who I am. If it were, these states wouldn’t come and go like the weather.

    I would also like to share something from Marshall Rosenberg’s work in Nonviolent Communication. In my experience, the feelings that Rick suggests we sink into arise l from the moments we get our needs met not necessarily from people. If I stand in the moments when my needs are met – say when I see the snow on the mountains, or when I get a paycheck, or when my dog does something funny – and I let the positive sensations of these moments sink in, I feel better about being here on this planet.

    I wish you well on our journey.

    Denise

RICK HANSON, Ph.D.
RICK HANSON, Ph.D.
Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. His books include Hardwiring Happiness (in 14 languages), Buddha’s Brain (in 25 languages), Just One Thing (in 14 languages), and Mother Nurture. He edits the Wise Brain Bulletin and has several audio programs. A summa cum laude graduate of UCLA and founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, he’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. His work has been featured on BBC, CBS, and NPR, and he offers the free Just One Thing newsletter with over 100,000 subscribers, plus the online Foundations of Well-Being program in positive neuroplasticity.

Learn More »

Contact

For inquiries about interviewing Rick Hanson or having him present for your organization, please click here.

FAQs

Find answers to a growing archive of nearly 100 questions on 20+ different topics here: FAQs.

The Foundations of Well-Being Program
Video Spotlight

Take in the Good - Rick Hanson at Chicago Ideas Week

Your Skillful Means Website

Sponsored by the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, Your Skillful Means offers a collection of methods for healing distress and dysfunction, promoting well-being and personal growth, and deepening spiritual practice.

Visit the Website »

Discover the Simple Method to More Joy and Less Stress

Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence

The new book by Rick Hanson, PhD


Available wherever books are sold