Search results for: negativity bias

I receive a lot of questions about the negativity bias and how to over come it. Here are a few: “Is the brain still evolving? Even though we have a brain sculpted by Stone Age experiences, is the brain in any way advancing into a...

You were quoted in a short post about negativity bias in which you stated, “The brain is like Velcro for negative experiences and Teflon for positives ones.” Can you explain this in more detail? As the brain evolved, it was critically important to learn from...

My previous post used the example of Stephen Colbert’s satirical “March to Keep Fear Alive” as a timely illustration of a larger point: humans evolved to be fearful — since that helped keep our ancestors alive — so we are very vulnerable to being frightened...

On today’s episode of the Being Well Podcast, Dr. Hanson explains why it’s important to respond to challenges from the “green zone” of the brain rather than reacting instinctively from the “red zone.” He then explores the biology behind these two systems, the role of mindfulness in moving from one to the other, and how to combat the brain’s evolved negativity bias.

In this talk from TedX Marin, 2013, Dr. Rick Hanson discusses how you can use the hidden power of everyday experiences to hardwire more happiness into your brain, and overcome the brain's negativity bias.

We want happiness that lasts, but stress and worry keep pushing it aside. That’s the brain’s “negativity bias.” I’ll show you how to beat that bias, and fill yourself with calm strength, confidence, compassion, and joy.

Part II of a talk and guided mediation given at Spirit Rock Meditation Center in March, 2011. Your brain evolved a negativity bias that makes it like Velcro for negative experiences but Teflon for positive ones. Therefore, a foundation for happiness is to deliberately weave positive experiences into the fabric of your brain and your self.

Do you feel swamped with bad news? The Practice: Find the good news. Why? “Tell the truth.” It’s the foundation of science – and the foundation of healthy relationships, communities, and countries. But the truth of things is complicated. To simplify, there is the good...

Are you feeling unneeded pain? The Practice: Minimize painful experiences. Why? Painful experiences range from subtle discomfort to extreme anguish – and there is a place for them. Sorrow can open the heart, anger can highlight injustices, fear can alert you to real threats, and...

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